Community Notices

Welcome to our Community Events and Notices E-News for Thursday, December 11, 2014

December image
Members & Staff of the PEI Advisory Council on the Status of Women wish you, your families, and your loved ones a season of peace & goodwill.

Our weekly community events notices will return on Thursday, January 8. We look forward to helping get the word out about your events in 2015.

New listings this week:
1) New Chairperson Announced for PAC
2) A Bold Vision For the Holidays
3) Restore-an-Acre
4) Brighten the Holidays for Seniors
5) Research Study Opportunity MSVU and U. of Waterloo
6) Toy Safety During the holidays: ‘Tis the season for safety

The current and past issues of our Thursday E-News with upcoming community events and notices are available at the following links:

_______________________________

Previous listings by title

To view the e-newsletter with specific details about an event, click on the title link:

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Honouring Our Indigenous Sisters / En l’honneur de nos sœurs autochtones

December 6, 2014
Honouring Our Indigenous Sisters

On Canada’s National Day of Action and Remembrance on Violence Against Women, it is our responsibility as Canadians to examine and address the root causes of our national human rights crisis: missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls.

NWAC Sisters in Spirit logo "Grandmother Moon" NWAC Sisters in Spirit logo "Grandmother Moon"/" Grandmère Lune " est le logo du projet Soeurs par l"esprit de l"AFAC

NWAC Sisters in Spirit logo “Grandmother Moon”
NWAC Sisters in Spirit logo “Grandmother Moon”/” Grandmère Lune ” est le logo du projet Soeurs par l”esprit de l”AFAC

These women are not just numbers. Sisters in Spirit research by the Native Women’s Association of Canada not only counted “stolen sisters” but restored to each her name and her story. Each is loved. All are missed. None are forgotten.

On November 25, the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women, the PEI Advisory Council on the Status of Women and the PEI Aboriginal Women’s Association held a public meeting. We acknowledged the leadership of Indigenous women’s organizations, and asked their permission to join our voices with theirs. We invited non-Indigenous women to be allies with Indigenous women to end the injustice and horror of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls.

The facts are clear and indicting. In 2013, the RCMP confirmed police records of 1,181 missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls: 164 missing and 1,017 murdered from 1980 to 2012. Indigenous women are three times more likely than other Canadian women to be victims of violence. Indigenous women make up about 4% of the Canadian population of women, but they make up 16% of murdered women. This is indeed a sociological phenomenon, rooted in sexism, racism, and ongoing colonization.

When we gathered in a circle, the Aboriginal Women’s Association added to our understanding of the roots of this national shame. Judy Clark, President of the association, spoke passionately about the historical and ongoing effects of colonialism. She spoke about the legacy of residential schools and the “sixties scoop” in which she witnessed children lost to their families, their communities, and their culture. She has experienced and witnessed an Indian Act that creates divisions and has too often excluded people, especially women, from their status, their treaty rights, and even a democratic role in their home communities. Ending this injustice will require us to support each other and walk together.

Vice-President Julie Pellissier-Lush talked about the importance of work with Aboriginal youth. She said culturally grounded programming, such as the Walking the Red Road program, “builds youth up to be the adults they’re meant to be,” respecting them, and cultivating pride in their Aboriginal identity. “Children need two or three adults in their lives whose eyes light up when they see them,” Julie said, and she spoke with hope about the adults whose eyes light up for Aboriginal youth.

Elder Kathy Knockwood Archer, a survivor of the cruelty of residential school, spoke devastatingly about her childhood experience and its long-term effects. In the past few years, there has been compensation for survivors, but “Money could not take away the hurt,” she said. “I was not to blame. But I can’t forgive. And I can’t forget.”

And yet this Elder of our Island who experienced so much pain, who was dehumanized, abused, and enslaved with her sisters and brothers in Shubenacadie residential school, shared a message of love and respect. Respect for Aboriginal identity. Love and care for children. Love and unity among all people. “”We want unity not just of Native people but all people. Is that too much to ask?” Elder Archer said.

Moccasin Vamps -  Image used with permission from Walking with Our Sisters.

“Moccasin Vamps” – Image used with permission from Walking with Our Sisters.

A national inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women is not too much to ask, and when it comes it must be done right. The PEI Advisory Council on the Status of Women calls for a national inquiry that respects the histories and cultures of Aboriginal peoples. It must look squarely in the face of white male colonial violence. It must not revictimize traumatized people. It must not blame victims. It must not create more harm. It must put Aboriginal peoples and their stories and experiences at the centre.

It is 25 years today since the Montreal Massacre, in which 14 women were singled out and murdered because they were women. In their memory, we remember and take action on gender-based violence across the country. In PEI, we remember nine women murdered on PEI in the past 25 years, at the hands of men who knew them. We wear purple ribbons to take a stand against violence against women.

And also in PEI, we join the call for a national inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women. We join the demand from the Native Women’s Association of Canada and Indigenous organizations and leaders. We join the demand from all the premiers and territorial leaders of Canada. As a society, we must answer the call for respect with actions, not words, to be part of a journey of healing.
Diane Kays, Chairperson
PEI Advisory Council on the Status of Women

**************************

Le 6 décembre 2014
En l’honneur de nos sœurs autochtones

Durant la Journée nationale de commémoration et d’action contre la violence faite aux femmes du Canada, il est de notre devoir d’examiner les causes premières de cette crise nationale des droits de la personne, soit la disparition et l’assassinat des femmes et des jeunes filles autochtones et de nous attaquer à celles-ci.

NWAC Sisters in Spirit logo "Grandmother Moon" NWAC Sisters in Spirit logo "Grandmother Moon"/" Grandmère Lune " est le logo du projet Soeurs par l"esprit de l"AFAC

NWAC Sisters in Spirit logo “Grandmother Moon”
NWAC Sisters in Spirit logo “Grandmother Moon”/” Grandmère Lune ” est le logo du projet Soeurs par l”esprit de l”AFAC

Ces femmes représentent bien plus que des nombres. L’initiative de recherche Sœurs par l’esprit, menée par l’Association des femmes autochtones du Canada, n’a pas simplement recensé nos « sœurs perdues », elle a aussi redonné à chacune d’entre elles, son nom et son histoire. Nous les aimons, elles nous manquent, nous ne les oublierons jamais.

Le 25 novembre, la Journée internationale pour l’élimination de la violence à l’égard des femmes, le Conseil consultatif sur la situation de la femme de l’Île du Prince Édouard et la PEI Aboriginal Women’s Association ont tenu une rencontre publique. Lors de cette rencontre, nous avons reconnu le rôle important des organismes pour les femmes autochtones et leur avons demandé de joindre notre voix à la leur. Nous avons invité les femmes qui ne sont pas autochtones à nous joindre pour mettre fin à l’injustice et à l’horreur que représentent la disparition et l’assassinat de femmes et de jeunes filles autochtones.

Les faits sont très clairs. En 2013, la Gendarmerie royale du Canada (GRC) a confirmé qu’elle détenait les dossiers de police de 1 181 femmes et jeunes filles autochtones disparues ou assassinées : 164 disparitions et 1 017 meurtres survenus entre 1980 et 2012. Selon la police, les femmes autochtones sont trois fois plus susceptibles que les autres Canadiennes d’être victimes de violence. Les femmes autochtones représentent environ 4 % des femmes canadiennes, mais elles constituent 16 % des femmes assassinées. Il s’agit en effet d’un phénomène sociologique, qui s’appuie sur le sexisme, le racisme et la colonisation persistante.

Lors de notre rencontre, la Aboriginal Women’s Association nous a mieux fait comprendre les causes premières de ce problème d’envergure national. Judy Clark, présidente de l’association, a parlé avec passion au sujet des effets historiques et persistants du colonialisme. Elle a parlé de l’expérience des pensionnats et de la « rafle des années soixante », durant laquelle elle a vu des enfants déracinés de leur famille, de leur collectivité et de leur culture. Elle sait que la Loi sur les Indiens a créé des divisions et trop souvent exclu des gens – en particulier les femmes – en les privant de leur statut, de leurs droits issus de traités et même de leur rôle démocratique an sein de leur collectivité. Pour mettre fin à cette injustice, il faudra se serrer les coudes et marcher main dans la main.

La vice-présidente Julie Pellissier-Lush a discuté de l’importance de travailler avec les jeunes autochtones. Elle a précisé que des programmes axés sur l’identité culturelle, comme le programme Walking the Red Road, « préparent les jeunes autochtones à devenir des adultes épanouis », en les respectant et en cultivant leur fierté autochtone. « Les enfants ont besoin de la présence de deux ou trois adultes qui sont heureux de les avoir dans leur vie », a déclaré Julie. Elle a aussi parlé avec confiance des adultes qui croient en la jeunesse autochtone.

Madame Kathy Knockwood Archer, une survivante de la cruauté des pensionnats, a fait un discours émouvant au sujet de son enfance et de ses effets à long terme. Au cours des dernières années, des compensations ont été offertes aux survivants, mais comme l’exprime madame Archer « l’argent ne peut pas enlever le mal qu’on nous a fait. Je n’ai rien fait de mal. Je ne suis pas capable de pardonner, et encore moins d’oublier. »

Malgré tout, cette Aînée de l’Île, qui a traversé tellement de souffrance et qui a été déshumanisée, maltraitée et forcée à aller au pensionnat de Shubenacadie avec ses frères et sœurs a tout de même réussi à transmettre un message d’amour et de respect : le respect pour l’identité autochtone, l’amour et l’attention pour les enfants et l’amour et l’unité pour tous. « Nous voulons former une unité non seulement pour les peuples autochtones, mais pour tous les peuples. Est-ce trop en demander? », a ajouté madame Archer.

Il est possible d’entreprendre une enquête nationale pour retrouver les femmes autochtones disparues et assassinées et lorsque le temps sera venu de la faire, il faudra bien la faire. Le Conseil consultatif sur la situation de la femme de l’Île du Prince Édouard demande une enquête nationale qui respecte l’histoire et la culture des peuples autochtones. Elle doit traiter sans détour la violence coloniale qui a été perpétrée par des hommes de race blanche. Elle ne doit pas victimiser de nouveau les personnes traumatisées. Elle ne doit pas blâmer les victimes. Elle ne doit pas faire plus de tort que celui déjà subi. Les peuples autochtones, leurs histoires et leurs expériences doivent être placés au cœur de l’enquête.

Moccasin Vamps -  Image used with permission from Walking with Our Sisters.

Moccasin Vamps – Image used with permission from Walking with Our Sisters.

Aujourd’hui, nous soulignons le 25e anniversaire du massacre montréalais, où 14 femmes ont été assassinées en raison de leur sexe. En leur honneur, nous nous souvenons d’elles et passons à l’action pour mettre un terme à la violence fondée sur le sexe au Canada. À l’Île du Prince Édouard, nous nous souvenons des neuf femmes qui ont été assassinées dans la province au cours des 25 dernières années, chacune assassinée par un homme qu’elle connaissait. Nous portons un ruban violet pour prendre position contre la violence faite aux femmes.

Également, à l’Île du Prince Édouard, nous demandons qu’une enquête nationale soit faite pour retrouver les femmes autochtones disparues et assassinées. Nous faisons la même demande que l’Association des femmes autochtones du Canada et les autres organismes autochtones. Nous rejoignons les premiers ministres et les dirigeants des territoires du Canada. En tant que société, nous nous devons de répondre à l’appel pour le respect des autochtones. Pour ce projet de guérison, il faudra bien plus que des paroles.

Diane Kays
Présidente du Conseil consultatif sur la situation de la femme de l’Î.-P.-É.

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Community Notices

Welcome to our Community Events and Notices E-News for Thursday, December 4, 2014

New listings this week:
1) Tomorrow: Memorial Services for Victims of Violence
2) Video – 2014 Purple Ribbon Call for an Inquiry
3) The Final Step Culture Show
4) PEIBWA Events and News
5) Deirdre Kessler Launches New Book this Saturday
6) Pop Up Market at the Kirk
7) Fanningbank Open House
8) Christmas Open House
9) Voluntary Resource Centre Holiday Open House
10) CLIA’s Open House
11) Campaign of Solidarity with Aboriginal Women
12) National Day of Action 2015

The current and past issues of our Thursday E-News with upcoming community events and notices are available at the following links:

_______________________________

Previous listings by title

To view the e-newsletter with specific details about an event, click on the title link:

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Community Notices

Welcome to our Community Events and Notices E-News for Thursday, November 27, 2014

New listings this week:
1) Postponed! Beyond Jian: A Community Meeting About Sexual Assault
2) Purple Ribbons Still Available!
3) Memorial Services for Victims of Violence
4) Video – 2014 Purple Ribbon Call for an Inquiry
5) Land Use Policy Event Rescheduled
6) Kids West Annual Christmas Caring Campaign
7) Project Coordinator Contract Opportunity
8) Soul Food is Sunday!
9) World AIDS Day 2014 – You are Invited!
10) Trade HERizons Information Sessions
11) Artisan Market at the Charlottetown Farmers Market
12) Upcoming Library Program at Confederation Centre Library
13) Women’s Network PEI’s 30th Anniversary Celebration
14) RESPECT Project: Community Conversations About Sexual Assault
15) ACIC is hiring a Provincial Coordinator in PEI and NL
16) McMaster Study about Women’s Experience with HIV Health and Social Services
17) Group Programming for Male Survivors of Sexual Abuse

The current and past issues of our Thursday E-News with upcoming community events and notices are available at the following links:

_______________________________

Previous listings by title

To view the e-newsletter with specific details about an event, click on the title link:

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Lunch and Learn: How to be an Ally

More than 40 people gathered for a Lunch & Learn on November 25, 2014 at noon, to consider how to be an ally to Indigenous women and girls. Some powerful stories of racism, exclusion and violence were shared, as well as initiatives that are addressing such challenges. Those gathered appreciated the opportunity to express their grief, their frustration and their will to become knowledgeable and respectful allies.

Thanks to: PEI Aboriginal Women’s Association for co-hosting with us; Justice Options for Women Project for providing refreshments from Beanz; and the Confederation Centre Public Library for providing space for the event.

L to R: Judy Clark, President of the Aboriginal Women’s Association; Julie Pellissier-Lush, Vice-President of the Aboriginal Women’s Association, Elder Kathy Knockwood Archer, Hon. Valerie Docherty, Minister Responsible for the Status of Women, and Diane Kays, Chairperson of the PEI Advisory Council on the Status of Women.

L to R: Julie Pellissier-Lush, Vice-President of the Aboriginal Women’s Association, Judy Clark, President of the Aboriginal Women’s Association, Elder Kathy Knockwood Archer, Hon. Valerie Docherty, Minister Responsible for the Status of Women, and Diane Kays, Chairperson of the PEI Advisory Council on the Status of Women.

photo 3 photo 2

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Community Notices

Welcome to our Community Events and Notices E-News for Thursday, November 20, 2014

New listings this week:
 1) Reminder: Lunch and Learn: Allies To End Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women
2) Fall/Winter Activities Update and Annual Report
4) Tonight! Don’t Miss Alejandra Ribera – An Innovative Songwriter, a Seductive Performer!
5) Coalition for Gun Control – Remembering December 6, 1989
6) Souper-Man Challenge This Saturday
7) Poetry Book Launch
8) Waves of Change
9) Beyond Jian: A Community Meeting About Sexual Assault
10) Up for Debate / Place au débat
11) PEIBWA Events
12) Petition to Feature Women on Bank Notes
13) Status of Women Canada Activities
14) City of Charlottetown Upcoming Activities
15) New Resource to Address Cyberbullying

The current and past issues of our Thursday E-News with upcoming community events and notices are available at the following links:

_______________________________

Previous listings by title

To view the e-newsletter with specific details about an event, click on the title link:

Leave a Comment

Canada World Youth Survey: Safety in Charlottetown

How safe do you feel in Charlottetown? How do your gender and identity affect your sense of safety?

Canada World Youth volunteers Jane-Joan Mensah and Sean MacLean have collaborated with the Advisory Council on the Status of Women to develop a safety audit survey for Charlottetown residents. The purpose of this survey is to gain perspective on the views of safety in Charlottetown from Charlottetown residents and make connections to issues of gender-based violence. The responses will be collected until the closing date on December 1st, 2014.

SURVEY LINK: http://surveymonkey.com/s/charlottetownsafetyaudit

The final results will be presented to the Mayor of Charlottetown at Charlottetown City Hall in December. The final results can also be retrieved through the Advisory Council on the Status of Women blog later in December on this blog post.

Thank you in advance on behalf of Canada World Youth and the Advisory Council on the Status of Women for your participation.

 

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