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Stepping Up Against Gender Violence – Paxton Caseley Memorial Service Address

DSC_0265If I ask you to think about an example of gender-based violence, it’s likely that for most of us, some of the first things that come to mind are the tragedies and more explosive events that leave their mark on individuals, families, and at times their communities. But the sad reality is that violence begins much earlier. It is something that grows and like everything that grows, it starts somewhere small. The beginnings of gender-based violence are all around us in our everyday lives. It’s the demeaning or sexist joke that someone might have said in passing. It’s ways in which women are objectified and over-sexualized in our media. It’s the constricting gender-roles and expectations that are forced upon women from the time they are born. The list goes on and on.

When we idly stand by, don’t speak up, or don’t question these things, we are giving permission for violence to occur. We are enabling the sexist remarks and reinforcing the superior attitudes of the person who make these demeaning jokes. We are allowing women to be erased, diminished, and minimized by forcing them to fit into gender roles that demand their silence and obedience. And it also means that we are telling women that their intelligence and tenacity are not as valuable as it is to be palatable. Talking about and treating women as though we are less are the beginnings of violence. When women and female-identifying individuals are viewed as being second-class, it can quickly descend into dangerous thinking and actions. Not only does it mean that our voices, opinions, and concerns do not hold as much merit or importance; but it also means that when we do speak up about inequality or our right to feel safe and be free of harassment, abuse, and violence that we are not being taken seriously, we are dismissed, we are subjected to gas-lighting, we are asked what were we wearing, and we are told that it probably wasn’t as bad as we thought.

And so, these seemingly small acts of violence all add up to perpetuate, or even allow violence to continue.

This year’s theme is about taking action to prevent violence against women and we all have a role to play. When I’ve taught bystander intervention courses, I always like to remind people that bystander intervention doesn’t have to look like a dramatic scene from a soap opera. You don’t need to be a hero. It’s truly as simple as voicing your discomfort if you hear someone make degrading comment. It de-escalates the situation and creates a pause in whatever momentum they may have had, and hopefully following that pause there will be some internal reflection.

This past year, I had the opportunity to work with students and various organizations across Canada as we worked to address the issue of sexual violence on post-secondary campuses. I heard from many survivors and victims of their personal experiences, and no matter where they were from or which province they studied in, I kept hearing time and time again of the damage and hurt that occurs when school administrators, police officers, friends, or even family refuse to believe them. Because rather than receive the support and justice that they rightfully deserve, they are often found at a standstill and are unable to move forward. In the context of post-secondary institutions, all too often we saw that student survivors were being punished for coming forward, and if they were not placed under gag order, forced to see their perpetrator on campus and in classes, or being revictimized by investigators, they were dropping out and unable to continue their education without the needed and deserved safety and support. When you find yourself in a situation where something horrific and traumatic has happened to you, that fear does not leave you for a very long time, or perhaps it never does. It takes tremendous courage to speak up and tell someone, especially as there is often a significant risk involved in disclosing your experience. This is why it is crucial for there to be institutional accountability in the form of provincial legislation and regulations because despite what we would like to believe, institutions do not always have the best interests of student survivors in mind.

So not only do we need to learn to recognize violent behaviours, but we also need to believe the survivors and victims of violence. We all have an important role to play in the prevention of gender-based violence. We can choose to take action or remain inactive, but no matter your choice, remember that both have their consequences. And so I ask you to listen and believe survivors, speak up when something doesn’t seem right, intervene and de-escalate the situation, but above all.. be the change that you want to see.

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2018 Memorial Service Gallery

The selection of photos below are from the December 6, 2018 Memorial Service for Victims of Violence held at the Confederation Centre of the Arts (venue sponsor). Thanks to everyone who attended the service and participated in the 2018 Purple Ribbon Campaign Against Violence.

We remember 1989
29 Years Since the Montreal Massacre

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

If you would prefer to view photos individually, view them at this link:

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Food Awareness Act Input

In October 2018, the Government of Prince Edward Island opened a process of consultation on a Food Awareness Act for PEI and sought advice on legislation and policy. Members of the PEI Advisory Council on the Status of Women engaged in an email consultation to answer the questions posed by the Department of Agriculture and Fisheries and submitted responses in November 2018.

The PEI Advisory Council on the Status of Women’s responses are available in this document: Input into the Food Awareness Act, November 20, 2018

For more information about the proposed act, visit https://www.princeedwardisland.ca/en/information/agriculture-and-fisheries/food-awareness-act-prince-edward-island

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Memorial Services for Victims of Violence

Time to step up. Be ready to prevent violence against women.

The Purple Ribbon Campaign Against Violence (Campagne du ruban violet contre la violence) was initiated by the PEI Advisory Council on the Status of Women in 1991 to remember the 14 women who were murdered at L’École Polytechnique in Montreal in December 1989, and to raise awareness about violence against women.

Charlottetown Memorial Service

CHARLOTTETOWN
12:00 noon, Thursday, December 6

Memorial Hall, Confederation Centre of the Arts (venue sponsor)
Richmond Street
Charlottetown

29 years after the horrific murder of 14 women at L’École Polytechnique in Montreal, we gather to remember, to mourn, and to work for change. We will be commemorating the young women who died in Montreal and the 10 Island women who have been killed by partners or someone who knew them since 1989. And we will recommit to ending violence against women everywhere.

The special service will include an address by Paxton Caseley of Our Turn; poetry by Lily Lévesque; Mi’kmaw opening prayer with Elder Julie Pellissier-Lush; music by the O Beautiful Gaia singers; and Dylan Menzie accompanying on piano. Family members, dignitaries, and community activists will light candles in remembrance of those whose lives were cut short because they were women. Everyone is welcome to attend.

Contact Michelle at 902-368-4510 / info@peistatusofwomen.ca

– 2018 Purple Ribbon Campaign, blog and website

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Summerside Memorial Service

SUMMERSIDE
12:00 noon, Thursday, December 6
Trinity United Church
90 Spring Street
Guest Speaker: Hon. Tina Mundy
More info: 902-436-9856
East Prince Women’s Information Centre

First mourn, then work for change
We remember 1989

29 Years Since the Montreal Massacre

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2018-2019 Purple Ribbon Campaign

Time to step up. Be ready to prevent violence against women.

The Purple Ribbon Campaign Against Violence (Campagne du ruban violet contre la violence) was initiated by the PEI Advisory Council on the Status of Women in 1991 to remember the 14 women who were murdered at L’École Polytechnique in Montreal on December 6, 1989, and to raise awareness about violence against women.

Time to step up. Be ready to prevent violence against women. What does it mean to “step up” when we witness situations of violence? We can take actions that may have a huge impact in preventing harm. Everyone who witnesses bullying, abuse, or violence can take responsibility to intervene in some way to make a positive difference. Taking action when we see signs of violence is being ready and stepping up for people who experience violence. Even small actions can make a difference and may even save a life. With every action to help, together, we can build a community ready to step up against violence.

Six steps to taking action when we see signs of abuse or violence
1. Notice that something is happening
2. Recognize signs of abuse or violence in what is happening
3. Take responsibility for providing help
4. Assess safety: the victim’s, the aggressor’s, yours, and others’ nearby
5. Decide how to help in a way that keeps us and the people around us safe
6. Take action to help



Memorial Services for Victims of Violence

December 6 is the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women. On and around December 6, candle-lighting services remember 14 young Women who in 1989 were murdered because they were women in what became known as the Montreal Massacre.

We remember ten women since 1989 murdered on Prince Edward Island by men who knew them. Join others in your community to light a candle of remembrance, to remember, to reflect, and to act so these murders end.

First mourn, then work for change
We remember 1989

29 Years Since the Montreal Massacre 

CHARLOTTETOWN
12:00 noon, Thursday, December 6
Memorial Hall, Confederation Centre of the Arts (venue sponsor)
Mi’kmaw ceremony & prayers: Elder Julie Pellissier-Lush
Guest Speaker: Paxton Caseley, Our Turn
Poetry by Lily Lévesque
Music: O Beautiful Gaia singers
Music to Accompany Candlelighting: Dylan Menzie (piano)
More info: 902-368-4510
PEI Advisory Council on the Status of Women

Candles will be lit in commemoration of the 14 women who were murdered in Montreal in 1989 and the 10 Island women who have died at the hands of violent men since that year.
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SUMMERSIDE
12:00 noon, Thursday, December 6
Trinity United Church
90 Spring Street, Summerside
Guest Speaker: Hon. Tina Mundy
More info: 902-436-9856
East Prince Women’s Information Centre

FINAL-2018-montreal massacre invitation


Teachers Resource Guide (Bilingual)
A Feature of the 2018 Purple Ribbon Campaign

Resource Guides
Handouts for Students / Documents à distribuer aux étudiants … PDF
Resources for Teachers / Ressources pour les enseignants … PDF
Resources to print on 11×17″ paper … PDF


Multilingual Poster

Time to step up. Be ready to prevent violence against women.

This year’s multilingual 11”x17” poster highlights the Purple Ribbon Campaign theme “Time to step up. Be ready to prevent violence against women” in English, French, Mi’kmaq, Arabic, Farsi, Mandarin, Nepali, Vietnamese, and Spanish. These represent the founding and most commonly spoken languages of our province. Posters are available by request.  Download printable multilingual poster.

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Bystander Infographic

(Click infographic to view larger)
English

2017-ENG-bystander-infographic

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French

2017-FRE-bystander-infographic


Orientation Sheet, 2013, PEI Advisory Council on the Status of Women

Artwork: “Seeds” by Mari Basiletti. This work was commissioned by and hangs in the waiting room of the PEI Rape and Sexual Assault Centre, Charlottetown.


Pinning Bee – Wednesday, November 14, 2018

2018-purple-ribbon-pinning-bee-poster

An evening pinning bee to prepare ribbons and cards for the 2018-2019 Purple Ribbon Campaign is being hosted by the PEI Advisory Council on the Status of Women, together with the working group planning Family Violence Prevention Week 2019 for the Premier’s Action Committee on Family Violence Prevention. The theme this year is: Time to step up. Be ready to prevent violence against women.

Annually, approximately 17,000 ribbons are cut and pinned to information cards by volunteers and distributed across the Island. The purple ribbons are worn to signify a commitment to remembering the 14 women murdered in Montreal in 1989, a horrific act of gender-based violence in Canadian history. We also wear purple ribbons to honour the memory of the Island women murdered by someone who knew them since 1989. And we wear ribbons to show our support for ending all violence against women in our communities.

  • Join us on Wednesday, November 14 for coffee, tea, snacks and conversation. Everyone welcome.
    6:30 pm – 8:00 pm
    Confederation Centre Public Library
    145 Richmond Street, Charlottetown.

For more information contact the PEI Advisory Council on the Status of Women at info@peistatusofwomen.ca or 902-368-4510.

To see a few photos from the Pinning Bee, click on this Facebook post link.


Thank You…

Thank you to the 2018 contributors to the Purple Ribbon Campaign for generous assistance. This list will be updated weekly, as contributors are confirmed:

  • Federated Women’s Institutes of PEI
  • Aboriginal Women’s Association
  • Confederation Centre of the Arts – Venue Sponsor
  • Premier’s Action Committee on Family Violence Prevention (PAC)
  • Office of the Premier
  • City of Charlottetown
  • Melissa Coffin, PEI Association for Newcomers to Canada
  • Translators: Thirly Levi (Mi’kmaq), Caitlyn Huynh (Vietnamese), Rocio McCallum (Spanish). Alex Yin (Mandarin Chinese), Krishna K. Thakur (Nepali), Farahnaz Rezaei (Arabic and Farsi) and the Translation | Traduction : Service de traduction du gouvernement de l’Î.-P.-É. (French).
  • Staff at Anderson House, Family Violence Prevention Services
  • Julie MacKay, UPEI student volunteer
  • Members of the public who attended the Pinning Bee
  • Ann Marie, Pat, Brent, and Dan for their tremendous help with our Purple Ribbon mailout
  • Brandy and Conner Beasley, and Maribeth Rogers Neale for assisting with collating and distributing purple ribbons and teachers’ guides
  • Paxton Caseley, guest speaker
  • Lily Lévesque for her poem “The Wolf”
  • O Beautiful Gaia singers
  • Dylan Menzie for piano accompaniment
  • Julie Pellissier-Lush for offering Mi’kmaw prayer
  • Eileen LeClair for bringing the UPSE Silent Witnesses silhouettes
  • Dawn Wilson
  • Lynn MacNeil
  • Dan Lee
  • Michelle Buttery for providing emotional care during the service
  • Interministerial Women’s Secretariat and Hearts & Flowers
  • Advisory Council members
  • Rob Warren and Paul Wood
  • and all of the candle-lighters – family members and friends of murdered PEI women, representatives of organizations working to prevent violence against women, and community leaders/dignitaries

Photos

Pinning Bee volunteers keeping busy at the Pinning Bee at the Confederation Centre Public Library.

Volunteers helping with the annual Purple Ribbon Campaign mailout. Thanks to Pat, Brent, Dan, and Ann Marie (missing from photo).

Click for more on past Purple Ribbon Campaigns.

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Chairs Circle 2018/Cercle des présidentes 2018

 

La version française suit.

Past Chairs Recognize Community Sector Contributions to Equality

Charlottetown, June 20, 2018 – Seven Chairpersons of the PEI Advisory Council on the Status of Women met recently in Charlottetown for an annual Chairs Circle discussion about gender equality.

Yvonne_Deagle_PEI_Status_of_Women_Chairperson_June_2018_photo_for_your_file

Yvonne Deagle,  Chairperson, PEIACSW

“This was my first time meeting with the past Chairpersons,” said Yvonne Deagle, the current Chairperson of the Advisory Council. “I was so impressed with the women I met. They have so much history, and they know so much about justice, health, leadership, violence against women, and human rights.”

The past Chairpersons reviewed a draft of the 2018 Equality Report Card that the current Council will release on June 27th. Deagle says the past Chairs added a longer-term view to the Report Card analysis. “So many of the issues for women have been going for a long, long time,” noted Deagle.

While the Equality Report Card charts the provincial government’s progress towards women’s equality goals, a theme in the Chairs Circle was the role of PEI’s community sector in creating positive change for women, children, and families. “As employees and as volunteers, women are the main force behind many community-based organizations that help Islanders,” said Mari Basiletti, chairperson from 2016 to early 2018. “The community sector provides real services and support – where vulnerable Islanders need it.”

Looking at the draft Report Card, many areas where the Chairs Circle saw good progress, it was thanks to effective support for and partnership with community-based organizations.

“Governments need to value community organizations more,” said Sharon O’Brien, chairperson from 1996 to 2000. “Money is part of it. Work with people living in poverty or dealing with violence or needing advocates for their rights requires resources.”

But, added Anne Nicholson, chairperson from 1993 to 1996, “Valuing community organizations also means more than money. Too much time and energy that could go to providing necessary services goes into building relationships with government.”

“Imagine what work would stop happening in PEI if the woman-led community sector went on strike,” said Colleen MacQuarrie, chairperson from 1992 to 1993. She noted that PEI is the only province in Canada without a minister mandated to work with the community sector. “The community sector is organizing and getting united. In the future, government will want to have a liaison to answer that voice. Valuing community organizations is a gender issue in PEI.”

PEI_Status_of_Women_Chairs_Circle_News_Release_June_20_2018_photo

Chairs Circle 2018 – Back Row (L-R): Colleen MacQuarrie, Anne Nicholson, Sharon O’Brien, and Kelly Robinson. Front Row (L-R): Mari Basiletti, Yvonne Deagle, and Kirstin Lund.

The Chairs Circle discussions on other themes, including justice, health, poverty, and violence, will be reflected in the 2018 Equality Report Card, being launched at 11:00 a.m. on Wednesday, June 27, at Cornwall Town Hall. All are welcome to the launch.

– 30 –

Contact:
PEI Advisory Council on the Status of Women
902-368-4510
info@peistatusofwomen.ca

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Les anciennes présidentes reconnaissent les contributions du secteur communautaire à l’atteinte de l’égalité

Charlottetown, le 20 juin 2018 – Sept femmes ayant occupé la présidence du Conseil consultatif sur la situation de la femme (CCSF) de l’Î.-P.-É. se sont récemment rencontrées à Charlottetown pour la discussion annuelle du Cercle des présidentes sur l’égalité des sexes.

Yvonne_Deagle_PEI_Status_of_Women_Chairperson_June_2018_photo_for_your_file

Yvonne Deagle, Présidente,
Conseil consultatif sur la situation de la femme de l’Île-du-Prince-Édouard

« C’est la première fois que je rencontrais les anciennes présidentes, a déclaré Yvonne Deagle, présidente actuelle du CCSF. J’ai été vraiment impressionnée par les femmes que j’ai rencontrées. Elles ont tellement d’expérience et de connaissances sur la justice, la santé, le leadership, la violence faite aux femmes et les droits de la personne. »

Les anciennes présidentes ont examiné l’ébauche de la Fiche de rendement sur l’égalité 2018, qui sera publiée par le CCSF actuel le 27 juin. Selon madame Deagle, les anciennes présidentes ont ajouté une vision à plus long terme de l’analyse de la fiche de rendement. « Plusieurs des questions qui concernent les femmes existent depuis très, très longtemps, » a-t-elle mentionné.

Quoique la Fiche de rendement sur l’égalité permette d’évaluer les progrès du gouvernement provincial dans l’atteinte des objectifs en matière d’égalité des femmes, l’un des thèmes du Cercle des présidentes était le rôle du secteur communautaire de l’Î.-P.-É. dans l’apport de changements positifs chez les femmes, les enfants et les familles. « En tant qu’employées et bénévoles, les femmes demeurent le principal moteur de nombreux organismes communautaires qui viennent en aide aux Insulaires, de dire Mari Basiletti, présidente de 2016 jusqu’au début de 2018. Le secteur communautaire offre de vrais services et un réel soutien – là où le besoin se fait sentir chez les Insulaires vulnérables. »

En examinant l’ébauche de la fiche de rendement, le Cercle des présidentes a constaté que dans de nombreux secteurs où les progrès s’avéraient satisfaisants, c’était grâce à un réel soutien des organismes communautaires et à un partenariat avec ceux-ci.

« Les gouvernements doivent accorder une plus grande importance aux organismes communautaires, a affirmé Sharon O’Brien, présidente de 1996 à 2000. L’argent fait partie de l’équation. Il faut des ressources pour travailler avec les gens qui vivent dans la pauvreté, qui sont victimes de violence ou qui ont besoin de quelqu’un pour défendre leurs droits. »

Mais, comme l’a ajouté Anne Nicholson, présidente de 1993 à 1996, « Le fait d’accorder une plus grande importance aux organismes communautaires ne se limite pas à l’argent. Il y a trop de temps et d’énergie de consacrés à l’établissement de relations avec le gouvernement; il faudrait plutôt s’assurer de fournir les services nécessaires. »

« Imaginez le travail qui ne serait plus accompli à l’Île-du-Prince-Édouard si le secteur communautaire, dirigé par des femmes, se mettait en grève, » a déclaré Colleen MacQuarrie, présidente de 1992 à 1993. Elle a ajouté que l’Île-du-Prince-Édouard est la seule province au Canada qui n’a pas de ministre dont le mandat consiste à travailler avec le secteur communautaire. « Le secteur communautaire s’organise et s’unit. À l’avenir, le gouvernement devra développer des liens avec celui-ci afin d’y répondre. La valorisation des organismes communautaires est une question de sexe à l’Île-du-Prince-Édouard. »                                                                                                                                     

PEI_Status_of_Women_Chairs_Circle_News_Release_June_20_2018_photo
Légende : Cercle des présidentes 2018 – Back Row (L-R): Colleen MacQuarrie, Anne Nicholson, Sharon O’Brien, Kelly Robinson. Front Row (L-R): Mari Basiletti, Yvonne Deagle, et Kirstin Lund.

Les discussions du Cercle des présidentes portant sur d’autres sujets comme la justice, la santé, la pauvreté et la violence seront reflétées dans la Fiche de rendement sur l’égalité 2018, qui sera lancée à l’hôtel de ville de Cornwall le mercredi 27 juin à 11 h. Tous sont les bienvenus au lancement.

– 30 –

Conseil consultatif sur la situation de la femme de l’Île-du-Prince-Édouard
(902) 368-4510
info@peistatusofwomen.ca

 

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National Status of Women Coalition Meeting Concludes in Halifax / Fin de l’assemblée de la Coalition nationale des conseils consultatifs sur la condition féminine à Halifax

coalition logo_WEB

National Status of Women Coalition Meeting Concludes in Halifax

La version française suit.

(June 8, 2018) The National Coalition of Provincial and Territorial Advisory Councils on the Status of Women held its annual meeting in Halifax June 5 to 6. The meeting ended with a new partnership between the coalition and the Canadian Women’s Foundation and a renewed commitment to advancing women’s leadership in Canada.

The meeting was hosted by the Nova Scotia Advisory Council on the Status of Women and participants discussed current challenges in achieving gender equality in our respective provinces and territories, while sharing resources and best practices.

Paulette Senior, CEO and president of the Canadian Women’s Foundation, was a guest speaker and provided coalition members with her advice on how women’s leadership can strengthen women’s voices in Canada. She also discussed the recently formed Gender Equality Network Canada, and their work to develop a national Gender Equality Action Plan.

Michelle Kelly, the coalition’s chair, led the group in a strategic planning discussion and identified next steps and future directions for the coalition.

“It is incredible to bring together a group of dynamic women to discuss how we can work collaboratively to ensure women’s voices are heard across our country,” said Ms. Kelly.

Ms. Kelly is the president of the Nova Scotia Advisory Council on the Status of Women and a partner with Cox and Palmer, practicing in commercial and insurance litigation.

The coalition discussed current issues and emerging best practices in supporting women’s leadership, addressing harassment and ending gender-based violence. Participants learned about two specific models in Nova Scotia, the domestic violence court program and legal advice for sexual assault survivors.

Michelle’s term as chair of the coalition was renewed for one year. The 2019 annual meeting date will be determined by the members of the coalition in the coming months.

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Local Media Contact:
PEI Advisory Council on the Status of Women
902-368-4510
info@peistatusofwomen.ca
Yvonne Deagle, Chairperson
Jane Ledwell, Executive Director

The National Coalition of Provincial and Territorial Advisory Councils on the Status of Women consists of provincial and territorial advisory councils from across the country dedicated to advancing women’s issues and gender equality within their individual regions, and nationally. This organization emerged following the federal government decision to eliminate the National Advisory Council on the Status of Women in 1995.

Hon. Kelly Regan, Minister Responsible for the Advisory Council on the Status of Women in Nova Scotia, joins members of the National Coalition of Provincial and Territorial Advisory Councils on the Status of Women during their annual meeting in Halifax, June 5-6 .

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Fin de l’assemblée de la Coalition nationale des conseils consultatifs sur la condition féminine à Halifax

Pour diffusion immédiate Communiqué
8 juin, 2018

La Coalition nationale des conseils consultatifs provinciaux et territoriaux sur la condition féminine a tenu son assemblée annuelle à Halifax les 5 et 6 juin. L’assemblée s’est terminée par un nouveau partenariat entre la coalition et la Fondation canadienne des femmes, et un engagement renouvelé envers l’avancement du leadership féminin au Canada.

Le Conseil consultatif sur la condition féminine de la Nouvelle-Écosse a été l’hôte de cette assemblée, où les participantes ont discuté des défis actuels en ce qui a trait à l’égalité des genres dans nos provinces et territoires respectifs, tout en échangeant des ressources et des pratiques exemplaires.

Paulette Senior, présidente et directrice générale de la Fondation canadienne des femmes, était l’une des conférencières et a offert aux membres de la coalition des conseils sur la façon dont le leadership féminin peut renforcer la voix des femmes au Canada. Elle a également parlé du nouveau Réseau d’égalité des genres Canada et de son travail visant à élaborer un plan d’action national pour l’égalité des genres.

Michelle Kelly, présidente de la coalition, a dirigé une discussion de planification stratégique en groupe qui a permis de déterminer les prochaines étapes et l’orientation future de la coalition. « Il est incroyable de pouvoir réunir un groupe de femmes dynamiques afin de discuter des façons dont nous pouvons collaborer pour faire en sorte que les voix des femmes soient entendues à l’échelle du pays », souligne Mme Kelly.

Mme Kelly est la présidente du Conseil consultatif sur la condition féminine de la Nouvelle-Écosse et associée au cabinet Cox and Palmer, où elle pratique le droit commercial et le droit sur les assurances.

Les membres de la coalition ont discuté des enjeux actuels et des nouvelles pratiques exemplaires en matière de soutien au leadership féminin, de lutte contre le harcèlement et d’élimination de la violence à caractère sexiste. Les participantes ont appris au sujet de deux modèles adoptés en Nouvelle-Écosse, soit le programme de tribunal de la violence familiale et le programme de consultation juridique pour les personnes qui ont subi une agression sexuelle. Le mandat de Michelle à titre de présidente de la coalition a été renouvelé pour une autre année. La date de l’assemblée annuelle de 2019 sera déterminée par les membres de la coalition au cours des prochains mois.

________________

Personne-ressource :
Conseil consultatif sur la situation de la femme de l’Île-du-Prince-Édouard
(902) 368-4510
info@peistatusofwomen.ca
Yvonne Deagle, Chairperson
Jane Ledwell, Executive Director

La Coalition nationale des conseils consultatifs provinciaux et territoriaux sur la condition de la femme est composée de conseils consultatifs provinciaux et territoriaux de partout au pays qui se consacrent à l’avancement des questions relatives aux femmes dans leurs régions respectives et à l’échelle nationale. Cette organisation est née de la décision du gouvernement fédéral d’éliminer le Conseil consultatif national sur la condition de la femme en 1995.

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