Posts Tagged montreal massacre

2017 Memorial Service Gallery

The selection of photos below are from the December 6, 2017 Memorial Service for Victims of Violence held at the Confederation Centre of the Arts (venue sponsor). Thanks to everyone who attended the service and participated in the 2017 Purple Ribbon Campaign Against Violence.

We remember 1989
28 Years Since the Montreal Massacre

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

If you would prefer to view photos individually, view it at this link:

_________________________

Advertisements

Leave a Comment

Memorial Services for Victims of Violence

Don’t stand by. Stand with. Everyone has a part to play in preventing violence against women.

The Purple Ribbon Campaign Against Violence (Campagne du ruban violet contre la violence) was initiated by the PEI Advisory Council on the Status of Women in 1991 to remember the 14 women who were murdered at L’École Polytechnique in Montreal in December 1989, and to raise awareness about violence against women.

December 6 is the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women. We remember fourteen young women who in 1989 were murdered because they were women in what became known as the Montreal Massacre. We remember ten women since 1989 murdered on Prince Edward Island by men who knew them. Join others in your community to light a candle of remembrance, to remember, to reflect, and to act so these murders end.

Charlottetown Memorial Service

CHARLOTTETOWN
12:00 noon, Wednesday, December 6
Memorial Hall, Confederation Centre of the Arts (venue sponsor)
Mi’kmaw ceremony & prayers: Elder Judy Clark & Julie Pellissier-Lush
Guest Speaker: Treena Smith
Music: Sylvia Abikhattar-Mutch & Peter Mutch
More info: 902-368-4510
PEI Advisory Council on the Status of Women

______________________

Summerside Memorial Service

SUMMERSIDE
12:00 noon, Wednesday, December 6
Summerside Baptist Church
219 Church Street
More info: 902-436-9856
East Prince Women’s Information Centre

First mourn, then work for change
We remember 1989

28 Years Since the Montreal Massacre 

 

Leave a Comment

2017-2018 Purple Ribbon Campaign

Don’t stand by. Stand with. Everyone has a part to play in preventing violence against women.

The Purple Ribbon Campaign Against Violence (Campagne du ruban violet contre la violence) was initiated by the PEI Advisory Council on the Status of Women in 1991 to remember the 14 women who were murdered at L’École Polytechnique in Montreal on December 6, 1989, and to raise awareness about violence against women.

Don’t stand by. Stand with. Everyone has a part to play in preventing violence against women. What does it mean to “stand with” people who experience violence? When we think of “bystanders” to violence we often think of witnesses, standing on the sidelines doing nothing. But what if everyone who witnessed bullying, abuse, or violence acted and intervened in some way to make a positive difference? Taking action when we see signs of violence is standing with the people who experience violence. Even small actions can make a difference. A small action could even save a life. With every action to help, together, we can build a community ready to take a stand against violence.

Six steps to taking action when we see signs of abuse or violence
1. Notice that something is happening
2. Recognize signs of abuse or violence in what is happening
3. Take responsibility for providing help
4. Assess safety: the victim’s, the aggressor’s, yours, and others’ nearby
5. Decide how to help in a way that keeps us and the people around us safe
6. Take action to help

(Click image to view it larger)


Memorial Services for Victims of Violence

December 6 is the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women. On and around December 6, candle-lighting services remember 14 young Women who in 1989 were murdered because they were women in what became known as the Montreal Massacre.

We remember ten women since 1989 murdered on Prince Edward Island by men who knew them. Join others in your community to light a candle of remembrance, to remember, to reflect, and to act so these murders end.

First mourn, then work for change
We remember 1989

28 Years Since the Montreal Massacre 

CHARLOTTETOWN
12:00 noon, Wednesday, December 6
Memorial Hall, Confederation Centre of the Arts (venue sponsor)
Mi’kmaw ceremony & prayers: Elder Judy Clark & Julie Pellissier-Lush
Guest Speaker: Treena Smith
Music: Sylvia Abikhattar-Mutch & Peter Mutch
More info: 902-368-4510
PEI Advisory Council on the Status of Women

Candles will be lit in commemoration of the 14 women who were murdered in Montreal in 1989 and the 10 Island women who have died at the hands of violent men since that year.
______________________

SUMMERSIDE
12:00 noon, Wednesday, December 6
Summerside Baptist Church
219 Church Street
More info: 902-436-9856
East Prince Women’s Information Centre


Teachers Resource Guide (Bilingual)
A Feature of the 2017 Purple Ribbon Campaign

Resource Guides
Handouts for Students / Documents à distribuer aux étudiants … PDF
Resources for Teachers / Ressources pour les enseignants … PDF
Resources to print on 11×17″ paper … PDF


Multilingual Poster

Don’t stand by. Stand with. Everyone has a part to play in ending violence against women.

This year’s multilingual 11×17” poster highlights the Purple Ribbon Campaign theme, “Don’t Stand By. Stand With.  Everyone has a part to play in preventing violence against women” in English, French, Mi’kmaq, Arabic, Farsi, Mandarin, Nepali, Korean, and Spanish. These represent the founding and most commonly spoken languages of our province. Thanks to JoDee Samuelson for adapting the bookmark image. Posters are available by request, or at http://www.gov.pe.ca/acsw.   Download printable multilingual poster.

________________________________

Bystander Infographic

(Click infographic to view larger)
English

2017-ENG-bystander-infographic

________________________________

French

2017-FRE-bystander-infographic


Orientation Sheet, 2013, PEI Advisory Council on the Status of Women
Artwork:
“Seeds” by Mari Basiletti. This work was commissioned by and hangs in the waiting room of the PEI Rape and Sexual Assault Centre, Charlottetown.


Pinning Bee – Thursday, November 9, 2017

It’s the season of purple! Our 2017-18 Campaign theme focuses on the power of bystanders: Don’t stand by. Stand with. Everyone has a part to play in ending violence against women.

Be a part of the solution by speaking up and taking action when you see violence occurring or have concerns that someone may be harmed. Be a part of the solution by wearing a purple ribbon to show your support for women and girls and your commitment to ending gender-based violence. Be a part of the solution by joining others to pin ribbons which will be distributed to schools, community groups and individuals across PEI.

The annual pinning bee will be held Thursday, November 9, 2017 at 6:30 – 8:00pm at the Confederation Centre Public Library, 145 Richmond Street, Charlottetown.

To see a few photos from the Pinning Bee, click on this Facebook post link:
https://www.facebook.com/peistatusofwomen/posts/1509083672461528


December 6, 2017 Commentary … bilingual

Related Articles:


Thank You…

Thank you to the 2017 contributors to the Purple Ribbon Campaign for generous assistance. This list will be updated weekly, as contributors are confirmed:

  • Federated Women’s Institutes of PEI
  • Premier Wade MacLauchlan’s Office
  • City of Charlottetown
  • Confederation Centre of the Arts – Venue Sponsor
  • Premier’s Action Committee on Family Violence Prevention (PAC)
  • Judy Clark and Julie Pellissier-Lush, PEI Aboriginal Women’s Association
  • PEI Association for Newcomers translators
  • Members of the public who attended the Pinning Bee
  • JoDee Samuelson, for adapting the bookmark image
  • Staff at Anderson House, Family Violence Prevention Services (FVPS)
  • Kate, Karen, Irma, and Dan for their tremendous help with our Purple Ribbon mailout
  • Excel Accounting Services Inc.- mailout sponsor
  • Lynn MacNeil, Brandy and Conner Beasley, Debbie Langston, and Maribeth Rogers for assisting with collating and distributing purple ribbons and teachers’ guides
  • Joanne McNeary
  • Kara Katmouz, FVPS Outreach Coordinator, West Prince Region
  • Treena Smith, guest speaker
  • Sylvia Abikhattar-Mutch, soloist
  • Peter Mutch, cellist
  • Elders Julie Pellissier-Lush and Judy Clark, Mi’kmaw opening
  • Eileen LeClair, UPSE Silent Witnesses
  • Dawn Wilson
  • Michelle Buttery
  • Interministerial Women’s Secretariat and Hearts & Flowers
  • Advisory Council members
  • Paul Wood and Rob Warren
  • and the 27 candlelighters who participated in the Memorial Service

Photos

Volunteers helping with the annual Purple Ribbon Campaign mailout. Thanks to Kate, Karen, Irma, and Dan.

Volunteers helping with the annual Purple Ribbon Campaign mailout. Thanks to Kate, Karen, Irma, and Dan.

Volunteers at the Pinnng Bee at the Confederation Centre Public Library.

Pinning Bee volunteers keeping busy at the Pinning Bee at the Confederation Centre Public Library.

Click for more on past Purple Ribbon Campaigns.

Leave a Comment

Bystanders Can Save Lives

PEI Family Violence Prevention Week, February 12 to 18, 2017, is focusing on what bystanders can do to help prevent and end violence. On December 6, 2016, at the Montreal Massacre Memorial Service in Charlottetown, PEI, PEI Advisory Council on the Status of Women Chairperson Mari Basiletti told her story of surviving an assault and having her life saved by a bystander’s intervention. Mari’s experience wasn’t family violence, but the bystander did not know this. Taking action as a bystander can save lives. Find out more about PEI’s Family Violence Prevention Week at stopfamilyviolence.pe.ca.

2017-02-14-12_40_12-bystanders-can-save-lives-on-vimeo

Leave a Comment

2016 Memorial Service Gallery

The selection of photos below are from the December 6, 2016 Memorial Service for Victims of Violence held at the Confederation Centre of the Arts (venue sponsor). Thanks to everyone who attended the service and participated in the 2016 Purple Ribbon Campaign Against Violence.

We remember 1989
27 Years Since the Montreal Massacre

img_2290dsc_6455dsc_6682dsc_6468dsc_6485dsc_6526dsc_6497dsc_6504dsc_6445dsc_6545dsc_6553dsc_6555dsc_6560dsc_6562dsc_6567dsc_6571dsc_6573dsc_6577dsc_6578dsc_6587dsc_6590dsc_6599dsc_6603dsc_6607dsc_6612dsc_6618dsc_6622dsc_6624dsc_6630dsc_6634dsc_6640dsc_6643dsc_6647dsc_6652dsc_6657dsc_6662dsc_6540dsc_6482img_2299dsc_6527dsc_6677dsc_6666dsc_6672dsc_6529dsc_6690dsc_6706dsc_6691dsc_6702dsc_6705dsc_6708img_2301dsc_6721dsc_6722dsc_6735dsc_6471img_2294dsc_6731dsc_6725

_________________________

  • December 6, 2016 – CBCNEWS PEI: ‘We have to keep reminding people:’ Montreal Massacre remembered in Charlottetown … link
  • December 6, 2016 – The Guardian: Charlottetown memorial remembers victims of violence against women … link

Leave a Comment

Believe Survivors / Croyez la victime

Believe Survivors

La version française suit

December 6, 2016

December has arrived – the time of year when we see the traditional red and green decorations everywhere in our communities. These are happy symbols of the festive holiday season now upon us. We also see people wearing small purple ribbons above their hearts on their winter coats – a sad symbol in remembrance of the fact of gender violence on Prince Edward Island.

2016-12-05-11_53_36-new-notificationThe PEI Advisory Council on the Status of Women launched the 2016 Purple Ribbon Campaign Against Violence on November 25th, the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women. The Campaign culminates in our Memorial Service on December 6th, the 27th anniversary of the Montreal Massacre. On that date we remember the 14 women who were murdered at the École Polytechnique in 1989 because they were women. Sadly, at our Annual Memorial Service we also remember the 10 women who have been murdered on PEI since 1989.

The statistics from Women in PEI 2015 show that in 2014-2015 women made up 85% of the victims of abuse cases, and 92% of the victims of sexual assault cases referred to Victim Services. Women have consistently made up at least 94% of the recipients of Emergency Protection Orders under PEI’s Victims of Family Violence Act. These statistics tell us that we need to continue our Purple Ribbon Campaign, and we need to increase our collective efforts to address the problem of male violence against women.

This year the theme of the Purple Ribbon Campaign is Believe Survivors. A survivor can be defined as “a person who carries on in spite of hardships or trauma.” There are many people in our society who have survived many hardships, including war and hunger, or hatred, isolation, and discrimination. Some Indigenous people in Canada have survived residential schools and their legacy; across Canada all Indigenous people have survived the historic trauma of policies and decisions that deny their worldview and that hurt them as a group. Some people have survived gender violence, family violence, sexual violence, emotional or psychological violence, or physical violence.

When someone who has survived trauma tells us about their ordeal, we need to listen to their story and we need to believe them. We do not need to doubt and question, we do not need to find proof. By listening and believing, we provide a safe place for them to share their traumatic memories. By listening and believing, we can reduce the sense of isolation the survivor may feel.

In Canada only a very low number of cases of violence against women are reported to police, and there are low rates of prosecution and conviction of the numbers that are reported. There is much that needs to be done to improve the response of our justice system to survivors of violence. But first we need to listen, and believe survivors.

The public is invited to attend the Memorial Service for Victims of Violence on Tuesday, December 6th, from 12:00 noon to 1 PM, in Memorial Hall, Confederation Centre of the Arts (venue sponsor) in Charlottetown.

Mari Basiletti, Chairperson
PEI Advisory Council on the Status of Women

***

Croyez la victime

6 décembre 2016

Le mois de décembre est arrivé – c’est le temps de l’année où nos communautés sont décorées en rouge et vert, couleurs traditionnelles du temps des Fêtes. Ce sont des symboles festifs de la saison. Nous voyons aussi des gens porter un petit ruban violet près de leur coeur, épinglé sur leur manteau d’hiver – un triste symbole de la violence sexiste qui existe à l’Île-du-Prince-Édouard.

2016-12-05-11_53_36-new-notificationLe 25 novembre, Journée internationale pour l’élimination de la violence à l’égard des femmes, le Conseil consultatif sur la situation de la femme de l’Î.-P.-É. a lancé sa Campagne du ruban violet contre la violence pour l’année 2016. Cette campagne se termine par notre service commémoratif le 6 décembre; il s’agira du 27e anniversaire du massacre de Montréal. Cette journée-là, nous nous souviendrons des 14 femmes qui ont été assassinées à l’École polytechnique en 1989 parce qu’elles étaient des femmes. Tristement, lors de notre service commémoratif, nous nous souviendrons aussi des 10 femmes qui ont été assassinées à l’Î.-P.-É. depuis 1989.

Les statistiques tirées de la publication Women in PEI 2015 démontrent qu’en 2014-2015, les femmes représentaient 85 % des victimes de violence et 92 % des victimes d’agression sexuelle orientées vers le Service d’aide aux victimes. Les femmes ont toujours représenté au moins 94·% des bénéficiaires d’ordonnances de protection d’urgence dans le cadre de la Victims of Family Violence Act (loi sur les victimes de violence familiale) de l’Î.-P.-É. Ces statistiques nous disent que nous devons poursuivre notre Campagne du ruban violet et que nous devons augmenter nos efforts collectifs pour aborder le problème de la violence des hommes contre les femmes.

Cette année, le thème de la Campagne du ruban violet est Croyez la victime. On peut décrire la victime comme étant « une personne qui poursuit sa vie malgré les difficultés ou les traumatismes qu’elle a pu vivre. » Bien des gens dans notre société ont enduré des épreuves, y compris la guerre, la faim, la haine, l’isolation et la discrimination. Certains peuples autochtones au Canada ont survécu aux pensionnats indiens ou sont affectés par l’héritage qu’ils ont laissé aux futures générations; tous les Autochtones du pays ont survécu au traumatisme historique des politiques et des décisions qui les ont privées de leur vision du monde et qui leur ont causé du tort en tant que groupe. Certaines personnes ont survécu à la violence axée sur les sexes, à la violence familiale, à la violence sexuelle, à la violence psychologique ou à la violence physique.

Lorsqu’une personne qui a survécu à un traumatisme nous raconte son épreuve, il faut écouter et croire. Il ne faut pas douter et questionner; il ne faut pas chercher des preuves. En l’écoutant et en la croyant, nous lui fournissons un endroit sécuritaire lui permettant de partager ses souvenirs traumatiques. Nous pouvons aussi atténuer son sentiment d’isolement.

Au Canada, très peu de cas de violence faite aux femmes sont signalés à la police, et les taux de poursuites et de condamnations découlant des cas qui sont signalés sont très bas. Il reste toujours beaucoup à faire afin d’améliorer les mesures d’intervention prises par la justice auprès des victimes de violence. D’abord, nous devons écouter et croire les victimes.

Le public est invité à assister au service commémoratif pour les victimes de violence le mardi 6 décembre de midi à 13 h dans la Salle commémorative du Centre des arts de la Confédération (commanditaire de la salle) à Charlottetown.

Mari Basiletti, la présidente
Conseil consultatif sur la situation de la femme de l’Île-du-Prince-Édouard

Comments (1)

Presentation on Family Violence Prevention

Prince Edward Island Advisory Council on the Status of Women
Presentation on Family Violence Prevention
to the Standing Committee on Health, Social Services and Seniors

Presented by Jane Ledwell, Executive Director
and Michelle Jay, Program Coordinator
March 12, 2014

Excerpt from presentation, page 1:

Every year for over twenty years, Island women organize and host a Montreal Massacre Memorial Service on December 6th. We honour the memory of murdered women with roses and candles and Silent Witnesses. We remember the 14 victims of the Montreal Massacre of 1989, but also the 9 Prince Edward Island women who have been murdered since 1989 at the hands of men who knew them.

Some of these women’s deaths fell into the category of “family violence,” committed by dating partners, common-law or marital partners, or exes. But some of these deaths were not “family violence.” Some were murdered by acquaintances or neighbours. The women murdered in the Montreal Massacre were murdered by a stranger, but they were selected, singled out, and murdered because they were women.

This is part of the reason that the Advisory Council on the Status of Women talks about “violence against women and children” as well as “family violence.” As a province, we need to work on both. Both violence against women and family violence are about power and control. And, we argue strongly, the root causes of both are found in gender inequality which distributes power and control unequally in families and in society.

Leave a Comment

Older Posts »