Posts Tagged montreal massacre

Thank You Card – December 6, 2018

Sincere and heartfelt appreciation to everyone who attended the 29th Montreal Massacre Memorial Service on December 6, 2018. The service was a beautiful and moving reminder of suffering, injustice and the resilience of women. We will not forget the 14 women who died in Montreal and the 10 women who died on PEI since 1989. We will not forget any woman who suffers violence. And we will ACT to end gender-based violence.

Time to step up. Be ready to prevent violence against women.

 

 

 

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Stepping Up Against Gender Violence – Paxton Caseley Memorial Service Address

DSC_0265If I ask you to think about an example of gender-based violence, it’s likely that for most of us, some of the first things that come to mind are the tragedies and more explosive events that leave their mark on individuals, families, and at times their communities. But the sad reality is that violence begins much earlier. It is something that grows and like everything that grows, it starts somewhere small. The beginnings of gender-based violence are all around us in our everyday lives. It’s the demeaning or sexist joke that someone might have said in passing. It’s ways in which women are objectified and over-sexualized in our media. It’s the constricting gender-roles and expectations that are forced upon women from the time they are born. The list goes on and on.

When we idly stand by, don’t speak up, or don’t question these things, we are giving permission for violence to occur. We are enabling the sexist remarks and reinforcing the superior attitudes of the person who make these demeaning jokes. We are allowing women to be erased, diminished, and minimized by forcing them to fit into gender roles that demand their silence and obedience. And it also means that we are telling women that their intelligence and tenacity are not as valuable as it is to be palatable. Talking about and treating women as though we are less are the beginnings of violence. When women and female-identifying individuals are viewed as being second-class, it can quickly descend into dangerous thinking and actions. Not only does it mean that our voices, opinions, and concerns do not hold as much merit or importance; but it also means that when we do speak up about inequality or our right to feel safe and be free of harassment, abuse, and violence that we are not being taken seriously, we are dismissed, we are subjected to gas-lighting, we are asked what were we wearing, and we are told that it probably wasn’t as bad as we thought.

And so, these seemingly small acts of violence all add up to perpetuate, or even allow violence to continue.

This year’s theme is about taking action to prevent violence against women and we all have a role to play. When I’ve taught bystander intervention courses, I always like to remind people that bystander intervention doesn’t have to look like a dramatic scene from a soap opera. You don’t need to be a hero. It’s truly as simple as voicing your discomfort if you hear someone make degrading comment. It de-escalates the situation and creates a pause in whatever momentum they may have had, and hopefully following that pause there will be some internal reflection.

This past year, I had the opportunity to work with students and various organizations across Canada as we worked to address the issue of sexual violence on post-secondary campuses. I heard from many survivors and victims of their personal experiences, and no matter where they were from or which province they studied in, I kept hearing time and time again of the damage and hurt that occurs when school administrators, police officers, friends, or even family refuse to believe them. Because rather than receive the support and justice that they rightfully deserve, they are often found at a standstill and are unable to move forward. In the context of post-secondary institutions, all too often we saw that student survivors were being punished for coming forward, and if they were not placed under gag order, forced to see their perpetrator on campus and in classes, or being revictimized by investigators, they were dropping out and unable to continue their education without the needed and deserved safety and support. When you find yourself in a situation where something horrific and traumatic has happened to you, that fear does not leave you for a very long time, or perhaps it never does. It takes tremendous courage to speak up and tell someone, especially as there is often a significant risk involved in disclosing your experience. This is why it is crucial for there to be institutional accountability in the form of provincial legislation and regulations because despite what we would like to believe, institutions do not always have the best interests of student survivors in mind.

So not only do we need to learn to recognize violent behaviours, but we also need to believe the survivors and victims of violence. We all have an important role to play in the prevention of gender-based violence. We can choose to take action or remain inactive, but no matter your choice, remember that both have their consequences. And so I ask you to listen and believe survivors, speak up when something doesn’t seem right, intervene and de-escalate the situation, but above all.. be the change that you want to see.

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2018 Memorial Service Gallery

The selection of photos below are from the December 6, 2018 Memorial Service for Victims of Violence held at the Confederation Centre of the Arts (venue sponsor). Thanks to everyone who attended the service and participated in the 2018 Purple Ribbon Campaign Against Violence.

We remember 1989
29 Years Since the Montreal Massacre

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If you would prefer to view photos individually, view them at this link:

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2017 Memorial Service Gallery

The selection of photos below are from the December 6, 2017 Memorial Service for Victims of Violence held at the Confederation Centre of the Arts (venue sponsor). Thanks to everyone who attended the service and participated in the 2017 Purple Ribbon Campaign Against Violence.

We remember 1989
28 Years Since the Montreal Massacre

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

If you would prefer to view photos individually, view it at this link:

_________________________

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Memorial Services for Victims of Violence

Don’t stand by. Stand with. Everyone has a part to play in preventing violence against women.

The Purple Ribbon Campaign Against Violence (Campagne du ruban violet contre la violence) was initiated by the PEI Advisory Council on the Status of Women in 1991 to remember the 14 women who were murdered at L’École Polytechnique in Montreal in December 1989, and to raise awareness about violence against women.

December 6 is the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women. We remember fourteen young women who in 1989 were murdered because they were women in what became known as the Montreal Massacre. We remember ten women since 1989 murdered on Prince Edward Island by men who knew them. Join others in your community to light a candle of remembrance, to remember, to reflect, and to act so these murders end.

Charlottetown Memorial Service

CHARLOTTETOWN
12:00 noon, Wednesday, December 6
Memorial Hall, Confederation Centre of the Arts (venue sponsor)
Mi’kmaw ceremony & prayers: Elder Judy Clark & Julie Pellissier-Lush
Guest Speaker: Treena Smith
Music: Sylvia Abikhattar-Mutch & Peter Mutch
More info: 902-368-4510
PEI Advisory Council on the Status of Women

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Summerside Memorial Service

SUMMERSIDE
12:00 noon, Wednesday, December 6
Summerside Baptist Church
219 Church Street
More info: 902-436-9856
East Prince Women’s Information Centre

First mourn, then work for change
We remember 1989

28 Years Since the Montreal Massacre 

 

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2017-2018 Purple Ribbon Campaign

Don’t stand by. Stand with. Everyone has a part to play in preventing violence against women.

The Purple Ribbon Campaign Against Violence (Campagne du ruban violet contre la violence) was initiated by the PEI Advisory Council on the Status of Women in 1991 to remember the 14 women who were murdered at L’École Polytechnique in Montreal on December 6, 1989, and to raise awareness about violence against women.

Don’t stand by. Stand with. Everyone has a part to play in preventing violence against women. What does it mean to “stand with” people who experience violence? When we think of “bystanders” to violence we often think of witnesses, standing on the sidelines doing nothing. But what if everyone who witnessed bullying, abuse, or violence acted and intervened in some way to make a positive difference? Taking action when we see signs of violence is standing with the people who experience violence. Even small actions can make a difference. A small action could even save a life. With every action to help, together, we can build a community ready to take a stand against violence.

Six steps to taking action when we see signs of abuse or violence
1. Notice that something is happening
2. Recognize signs of abuse or violence in what is happening
3. Take responsibility for providing help
4. Assess safety: the victim’s, the aggressor’s, yours, and others’ nearby
5. Decide how to help in a way that keeps us and the people around us safe
6. Take action to help

(Click image to view it larger)


Memorial Services for Victims of Violence

December 6 is the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women. On and around December 6, candle-lighting services remember 14 young Women who in 1989 were murdered because they were women in what became known as the Montreal Massacre.

We remember ten women since 1989 murdered on Prince Edward Island by men who knew them. Join others in your community to light a candle of remembrance, to remember, to reflect, and to act so these murders end.

First mourn, then work for change
We remember 1989

28 Years Since the Montreal Massacre 

CHARLOTTETOWN
12:00 noon, Wednesday, December 6
Memorial Hall, Confederation Centre of the Arts (venue sponsor)
Mi’kmaw ceremony & prayers: Elder Judy Clark & Julie Pellissier-Lush
Guest Speaker: Treena Smith
Music: Sylvia Abikhattar-Mutch & Peter Mutch
More info: 902-368-4510
PEI Advisory Council on the Status of Women

Candles will be lit in commemoration of the 14 women who were murdered in Montreal in 1989 and the 10 Island women who have died at the hands of violent men since that year.
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SUMMERSIDE
12:00 noon, Wednesday, December 6
Summerside Baptist Church
219 Church Street
More info: 902-436-9856
East Prince Women’s Information Centre


Teachers Resource Guide (Bilingual)
A Feature of the 2017 Purple Ribbon Campaign

Resource Guides
Handouts for Students / Documents à distribuer aux étudiants … PDF
Resources for Teachers / Ressources pour les enseignants … PDF
Resources to print on 11×17″ paper … PDF


Multilingual Poster

Don’t stand by. Stand with. Everyone has a part to play in ending violence against women.

This year’s multilingual 11×17” poster highlights the Purple Ribbon Campaign theme, “Don’t Stand By. Stand With.  Everyone has a part to play in preventing violence against women” in English, French, Mi’kmaq, Arabic, Farsi, Mandarin, Nepali, Korean, and Spanish. These represent the founding and most commonly spoken languages of our province. Thanks to JoDee Samuelson for adapting the bookmark image. Posters are available by request, or at http://www.gov.pe.ca/acsw.   Download printable multilingual poster.

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Bystander Infographic

(Click infographic to view larger)
English

2017-ENG-bystander-infographic

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French

2017-FRE-bystander-infographic


Orientation Sheet, 2013, PEI Advisory Council on the Status of Women
Artwork:
“Seeds” by Mari Basiletti. This work was commissioned by and hangs in the waiting room of the PEI Rape and Sexual Assault Centre, Charlottetown.


Pinning Bee – Thursday, November 9, 2017

It’s the season of purple! Our 2017-18 Campaign theme focuses on the power of bystanders: Don’t stand by. Stand with. Everyone has a part to play in ending violence against women.

Be a part of the solution by speaking up and taking action when you see violence occurring or have concerns that someone may be harmed. Be a part of the solution by wearing a purple ribbon to show your support for women and girls and your commitment to ending gender-based violence. Be a part of the solution by joining others to pin ribbons which will be distributed to schools, community groups and individuals across PEI.

The annual pinning bee will be held Thursday, November 9, 2017 at 6:30 – 8:00pm at the Confederation Centre Public Library, 145 Richmond Street, Charlottetown.

To see a few photos from the Pinning Bee, click on this Facebook post link:
https://www.facebook.com/peistatusofwomen/posts/1509083672461528


December 6, 2017 Commentary … bilingual

Related Articles:


Thank You…

Thank you to the 2017 contributors to the Purple Ribbon Campaign for generous assistance. This list will be updated weekly, as contributors are confirmed:

  • Federated Women’s Institutes of PEI
  • Premier Wade MacLauchlan’s Office
  • City of Charlottetown
  • Confederation Centre of the Arts – Venue Sponsor
  • Premier’s Action Committee on Family Violence Prevention (PAC)
  • Judy Clark and Julie Pellissier-Lush, PEI Aboriginal Women’s Association
  • PEI Association for Newcomers translators
  • Members of the public who attended the Pinning Bee
  • JoDee Samuelson, for adapting the bookmark image
  • Staff at Anderson House, Family Violence Prevention Services (FVPS)
  • Kate, Karen, Irma, and Dan for their tremendous help with our Purple Ribbon mailout
  • Excel Accounting Services Inc.- mailout sponsor
  • Lynn MacNeil, Brandy and Conner Beasley, Debbie Langston, and Maribeth Rogers for assisting with collating and distributing purple ribbons and teachers’ guides
  • Joanne McNeary
  • Kara Katmouz, FVPS Outreach Coordinator, West Prince Region
  • Treena Smith, guest speaker
  • Sylvia Abikhattar-Mutch, soloist
  • Peter Mutch, cellist
  • Elders Julie Pellissier-Lush and Judy Clark, Mi’kmaw opening
  • Eileen LeClair, UPSE Silent Witnesses
  • Dawn Wilson
  • Michelle Buttery
  • Interministerial Women’s Secretariat and Hearts & Flowers
  • Advisory Council members
  • Paul Wood and Rob Warren
  • and the 27 candlelighters who participated in the Memorial Service

Photos

Volunteers helping with the annual Purple Ribbon Campaign mailout. Thanks to Kate, Karen, Irma, and Dan.

Volunteers helping with the annual Purple Ribbon Campaign mailout. Thanks to Kate, Karen, Irma, and Dan.

Volunteers at the Pinnng Bee at the Confederation Centre Public Library.

Pinning Bee volunteers keeping busy at the Pinning Bee at the Confederation Centre Public Library.

Click for more on past Purple Ribbon Campaigns.

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Bystanders Can Save Lives

PEI Family Violence Prevention Week, February 12 to 18, 2017, is focusing on what bystanders can do to help prevent and end violence. On December 6, 2016, at the Montreal Massacre Memorial Service in Charlottetown, PEI, PEI Advisory Council on the Status of Women Chairperson Mari Basiletti told her story of surviving an assault and having her life saved by a bystander’s intervention. Mari’s experience wasn’t family violence, but the bystander did not know this. Taking action as a bystander can save lives. Find out more about PEI’s Family Violence Prevention Week at stopfamilyviolence.pe.ca.

2017-02-14-12_40_12-bystanders-can-save-lives-on-vimeo

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