Electoral Options

A PREFERENCE FOR EQUALITY
A Gender & Diversity Analysis of Electoral Options

Prepared by the PEI Advisory Council on the Status of Women and PEI Coalition for Women in Government

final-2016-electoral-reform-resource-cover


Abstract Vector Question Mark Colorful Symbol made from Splashes, Blots, Stains

QUIZ: WHAT IS YOUR ELECTORAL PERSONALITY TYPE?  (ENG) – 5 options

 

QUIZ : QUELLE EST VOTRE PERSONNALITÉ ÉLECTORALE? (FR) – 5 choix

 


PROPORTIONAL REPRESENTATION SYSTEMS

The Proportional Representation (PR) electoral systems DMP and MMP match the percentage of seats a party gets in the Legislature with the percentage of votes the party earns in an election. As a result, every vote counts and every party that earns a significant number of votes gets seats in the legislature. DMP and MMP eliminate “false majorities” that are common under the current electoral system. DMP and MMP tend to elect coalition governments that require parties to work together to achieve their goals. As a result, these systems tend to reduce negative campaigning. Proportional Representation systems like DMP and MMP are used frequently around the world, and, on average, they elect more women and result in more diverse legislatures. Proportional representation electoral systems tend to elect stable governments: there’s no incentive to return to the polls, since small changes in the popular vote can’t swing elections dramatically as they can in the current electoral system. All the options except FPTP+LEADERS ensure no one becomes an MLA without their name on an election ballot.

MMP

MMP has some special features. It is used in countries such as Scotland, Germany, and New Zealand. Voting under MMP results in having a district MLA and also having access to province-wide MLAs elected from a list. MMP has a two-part ballot to allow you to elect the district and province-wide MLAs of your choice. You can vote for a local candidate and province-wide candidate from two different parties if you like. Because MMP nominates both district candidates and province-wide candidates, changes to the current district-by-district nomination system would be necessary, and MMP makes it easier to present a slate of candidates with gender balance and greater diversity. Independent candidates can run and be elected as district MLAs. For more information about MMP, visit peipr.ca/dmp-mmp.

DMP

DMP is a new electoral system that would be unique to Prince Edward Island. DMP retains a simple one-X ballot, and your one vote gives you two district representatives. Because all MLAs would still be district MLAs, there’s a strong chance that MLAs elected under DMP would focus on local issues. Candidates would be nominated in the usual way under DMP, though parties could nominate two candidates, ranked as first and second. (Candidates ranked first would have the best chance to win.) Independent candidates can run in all districts and may even have a better chance to be elected under DMP. For more information about DMP, visit For more information about MMP, visit peipr.ca/dmp-mmp.


WINNER-TAKE-ALL SYSTEMS

Winner-take-all electoral systems do not match the percentage of seats a party gets in the Legislature with the percentage of votes the party earns in an election. The party that gets the most district seats gets all of the power. FPTP+LEADERS does not eliminate “false majorities” that are common under the current electoral system. Also, not every vote counts towards electing someone: if you vote for a candidate or party that does not win in your district, your vote doesn’t count because it did not contribute to electing someone as your representative. In winner-take-all systems, every MLA is a district MLA, so there is likely to be strong focus on local issues. Candidates’ nominations would likely continue to be done district by district, which makes it challenging to increase gender balance or diversity. PV will probably tend to elect majority governments that allow the winning party to get things done alone, without requiring they work together with other parties to achieve their goals. Winner-take-all systems may reward negative campaigning, because the winner takes all and the government will likely be a majority. Tweaks to winner-take-all systems are not likely to elect significantly more women or result in more diverse legislatures. All the electoral options on offer for PEI tend to elect stable governments. All the electoral options on offer for PEI allow independent candidates to run and be elected. All the options except FPTP+LEADERS ensure no one becomes an MLA without their name on an election ballot.

FPTP – FIRST-PAST-THE-POST

First-Past-the-Post (FPTP) is the current WINNER-TAKE-ALL electoral system.

FPTP is used elsewhere in Canada and the world, but no new democracies or democracies that have changed their electoral systems have chosen FPTP.

FPTP+LEADERS – FIRST-PAST-THE-POST PLUS LEADERS

FPTP+LEADERS is a WINNER-TAKE-ALL electoral system – the current system (FPTP) with seats added in automatically for leaders of parties that earn 10% or more of the popular vote. FPTP+LEADERS is a winner-take-all electoral system.  It has some special features. It is not used elsewhere and would be unique to Prince Edward Island. It is more likely to result in a seat for third and fourth parties in the Legislature: this would most often be the leader’s seat. The leaders would not run in a district or face voters on the ballot: they would campaign province-wide and be elected if their party were elected. Parties could still change leaders between elections. FPTP+LEADERS may actually reduce the gender balance and diversity in the Legislature, unless parties change their dismal record selecting women and members of diverse groups as leader.

PV – PREFERENTIAL VOTING

By itself, preferential voting is not an electoral system. It is a tool used in an electoral system – in this case, a tool used in the current WINNER-TAKE-ALL electoral system we already use.

PV has some special features. Only PV eliminates the chance of a tie that would have to be decided by a coin toss or another vote. The ranked ballot lets the voter express more of their point of view than a single X. When voters actually rank the candidates instead of choosing only one, there is more chance their vote will count instead of being wasted. Because candidates want your support for second place or third place even if you’re not their top choice, PV will likely reduce negative campaigning. PV is used around the world in places such as Australia. It is used in Canada for many nominations and leadership contests. It is being used for the PEI plebiscite on electoral reform!


SYSTÈMES À REPRÉSENTATION PROPORTIONNELLE

Dans les systèmes électoraux à représentation proportionnelle – qu’il s’agisse d’un système mixte binominal avec compensation proportionnelle ou d’un système mixte avec compensation proportionnelle –, le pourcentage de sièges qu’un parti obtient à l’Assemblée législative correspond au pourcentage de votes exprimés en sa faveur. Ainsi, chaque vote compte et chaque parti qui recueille un nombre considérable de votes remporte des sièges à l’Assemblée. Les systèmes mixte avec compensation proportionnelle et mixte binominal avec compensation proportionnelle permettent d’éliminer les « fausses majorités », qui sont fréquentes dans le système électoral actuel. De plus, ces deux systèmes électoraux se traduisent souvent par des gouvernements de coalition, ce qui exige des partis qu’ils travaillent ensemble pour atteindre leurs objectifs. Ils tendent donc à diminuer les campagnes négatives. Les systèmes à représentation proportionnelle, comme les systèmes mixte avec compensation proportionnelle et mixte binominal avec compensation proportionnelle, sont fréquemment utilisés ailleurs dans le monde et, de manière générale, ils permettent l’élection d’un plus grand nombre de femmes et se traduisent par une plus grande diversité au sein des assemblées législatives. Les systèmes électoraux à représentation proportionnelle mènent généralement à l’élection de gouvernements stables : rien n’incite les partis à retourner aux urnes, puisque de petits changements dans les suffrages ne peuvent pas faire basculer radicalement les élections comme c’est le cas dans le système électoral actuel. Toutes les options, à l’exception du système uninominal majoritaire à un tour avec compensation, permettent de s’assurer que personne n’est élu député si son nom n’apparaît pas sur le bulletin de vote.

SYSTÈME MIXTE AVEC COMPENSATION PROPORTIONNELLE

Le système mixte avec compensation proportionnelle présente quelques particularités. Il est utilisé en Écosse, en Allemagne et en Nouvelle-Zélande, notamment. Ce système mène à l’élection de députés de circonscription et de députés pour l’ensemble de la province choisis à partir d’une liste. Le bulletin de vote comporte deux parties, soit une pour élire le député de la circonscription et une autre pour élire un des députés représentant l’ensemble de la province. Vous pouvez voter pour un candidat local et un candidat général appartenant à des partis politiques différents si vous le désirez. Étant donné que le système mixte avec compensation proportionnelle exige la nomination de candidats locaux et généraux, il faudrait apporter des changements à l’actuel système de nomination par circonscription. Dans un système mixte avec compensation proportionnelle, il est plus facile pour les partis de présenter une liste de candidats qui respecte la parité hommes-femmes et qui reflète une plus grande diversité. Des candidats indépendants peuvent se présenter et se faire élire comme députés de circonscription. Pour de plus amples renseignements sur le système mixte avec compensation proportionnelle, consultez le site peipr.ca/dmp-mmp (en anglais seulement).

SYSTÈME MIXTE BINOMINAL AVEC COMPENSATION PROPORTIONNELLE

Le système mixte binominal avec compensation proportionnelle est un nouveau système électoral, qui serait donc unique à l’Île-du-Prince-Édouard. Dans un système mixte binominal avec compensation proportionnelle, le bulletin de vote reste simple, sauf que le « x » fait par l’électeur permet l’élection de deux représentants de circonscription. Étant donné que tous les députés sont des députés locaux, il est fort probable que les députés élus en vertu d’un système mixte binominal avec compensation proportionnelle se concentrent sur les enjeux de leur circonscription. Les candidats sont nommés de la manière habituelle, et les partis peuvent nommer deux candidats, soit un candidat principal et un candidat secondaire. (Les candidats principaux ont plus de chances de l’emporter.) Les candidats indépendants peuvent se présenter dans toutes les circonscriptions et peuvent même avoir de meilleures chances d’être élus dans un système mixte binominal avec compensation proportionnelle. Pour de plus amples renseignements sur le système mixte binominal avec compensation proportionnelle, consultez le site peipr.ca/dmp-mmp (en anglais seulement).

SYSTÈMES UNINOMINAUX MAJORITAIRES

Dans les systèmes électoraux uninominaux majoritaires, le pourcentage de sièges qu’un parti obtient à l’Assemblée législative ne correspond pas au pourcentage de votes exprimés en sa faveur. Le parti politique qui fait élire des candidats dans le plus grand nombre de circonscriptions se retrouve seul au pouvoir. Le système uninominal majoritaire à un tour avec compensation n’élimine pas les « fausses majorités », qui sont fréquentes dans le système électoral actuel. De plus, ce ne sont pas tous les votes qui comptent : si vous votez pour un autre candidat ou parti que celui élu dans votre circonscription, votre vote est perdu, car il n’a pas contribué à l’élection de votre député. Dans les systèmes uninominaux majoritaires, tous les députés sont des députés locaux; il est donc fort probable qu’ils accordent une importance toute particulière aux enjeux de leur circonscription. La nomination des candidats continue vraisemblablement de se faire circonscription par circonscription, rendant difficile l’amélioration de la parité hommes-femmes ou l’augmentation de la diversité à l’Assemblée législative. Un mode de scrutin préférentiel se traduirait probablement par l’élection de gouvernements majoritaires où le parti gagnant peut travailler seul de son côté, sans avoir à collaborer avec les autres partis pour atteindre ses objectifs. Les systèmes uninominaux majoritaires peuvent favoriser les campagnes négatives, parce que le gagnant remporte tout et qu’il est fort probable que le gouvernement élu soit majoritaire. De petites modifications aux systèmes uninominaux majoritaires ne permettraient probablement pas de faire élire un nombre considérablement plus élevé de femmes ou de favoriser une plus grande diversité à l’Assemblée législative. Toutes les options électorales proposées pour l’Île-du-Prince-Édouard permettraient d’élire des gouvernements stables et permettraient à des candidats indépendants de se présenter et d’être élus. Toutes les options, à l’exception du système uninominal majoritaire à un tour avec compensation, permettent de s’assurer que personne n’est élu député si son nom n’apparaît pas sur le bulletin de vote.

SYSTÈME UNINOMINAL MAJORITAIRE À UN TOUR

Le système uninominal majoritaire à un tour est le système électoral UNINOMINAL MAJORITAIRE actuellement en vigueur.

Le système uninominal majoritaire à un tour est utilisé ailleurs au Canada et dans le monde, mais aucune nouvelle démocratie ou démocratie ayant modifié son système électoral n’a choisi ce système.

SYSTÈME UNINOMINAL MAJORITAIRE À UN TOUR AVEC COMPENSATION

Il s’agit d’un système semblable au système uninominal majoritaire à un tour actuellement en vigueur, sauf qu’il prévoit en plus des sièges supplémentaires pour les chefs des partis politiques qui atteignent le seuil de 10 % des suffrages exprimés.

Le système uninominal majoritaire à un tour avec compensation présente quelques particularités. Il n’est utilisé nulle part ailleurs, et serait donc unique à l’Île-du-Prince-Édouard. Les troisième et quatrième partis en importance auraient davantage de chances d’obtenir un siège à l’Assemblée législative si un tel système était en place. Il s’agirait le plus souvent du siège du chef de parti. Les chefs des partis ne seraient pas candidats dans une circonscription et ils n’auraient pas à se soumettre au vote des électeurs. Ils feraient campagne à l’échelle de la province et seraient élus si leur parti était élu. Les partis pourraient toujours changer de chef entre les élections. Le système uninominal majoritaire à un tour avec compensation pourrait en fait entraîner une diminution de la parité hommes-femmes et de la diversité à l’Assemblée législative, à moins que les partis n’améliorent leur piètre bilan en ce qui concerne l’élection de femmes et de membres des groupes désignés comme chefs de parti.

MODE DE SCRUTIN PRÉFÉRENTIEL

En soi, le mode de scrutin préférentiel n’est pas un système électoral. C’est un outil utilisé dans un système électoral – dans ce cas-ci, un outil utilisé dans le système électoral uninominal majoritaire actuellement en vigueur.

Le mode de scrutin préférentiel présente quelques particularités. Seul le mode de scrutin préférentiel élimine la possibilité d’une égalité qui doit être départagée à pile ou face ou par la tenue d’un autre vote. Le bulletin de vote avec classement par ordre de préférence permet à l’électeur d’exprimer davantage son point de vue que lorsqu’il n’a qu’à faire un « x » à côté de son choix. Lorsque les électeurs classent les candidats selon leurs préférences au lieu d’en choisir seulement un, il y a plus de chances que leur vote compte au lieu d’être perdu. Le mode de scrutin préférentiel entraînerait probablement une diminution des campagnes négatives, étant donné que les candidats souhaitent obtenir l’appui des électeurs pour le deuxième ou le troisième rang même s’ils ne sont pas leur premier choix. Le mode de scrutin préférentiel est utilisé ailleurs dans le monde, notamment en Australie. Il est utilisé au Canada pour de nombreuses nominations et courses à la direction. Et il est aussi utilisé pour le plébiscite portant sur la réforme électorale à l’Île-du-Prince-Édouard!


%d bloggers like this: